Recent Stories

Alyssa Lang speaks into SEC Network microphone

USC alumna living her dream at SEC Network

November 16, 2022, Alexis Watts

2015 Broadcast Journalism graduate, Alyssa Lang gives fans an all-access pass to the most storied conference in sports. Lang is a host, anchor and reporter for SEC Network. She is now holding down studio shows, breaking major stories and doing the hard work of bringing fans essential reports about their beloved teams.

portrait of Kirstin Dow

Geography professor maps heat islands as we adapt to climate change

November 16, 2022, Craig Brandhorst

Longtime University of South Carolina geography professor Kirstin Dow has devoted much of her career to understanding climate impact, vulnerability and adaptation. In other words, she recognizes the problems posed by our warming planet and is determined to help mitigate them, most recently by mapping heat islands so that urban planners can make better decisions about where to plant trees, generate more shade or support investment in affordable renewable energy and energy efficiency.

Remembering the Days podcast art

Remembering the Days -- The Duel of 1833

November 14, 2022, Chris Horn

Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton engaged in an infamous duel in 1804, and a number of South Carolina College students nearly got tangled up in duels in the years before the Civil War. History records only one duel  involving South Carolina College students that ended in fatality — and this is the strange story of that tragedy. 

A medical student looking into a child's ear.

USC researchers, graduates work to fill health care needs in rural areas

November 10, 2022

It’s no secret that South Carolina faces a litany of health care challenges, and that these challenges hit especially hard in rural areas. With its comprehensive portfolio of health science and health care offerings, the University of South Carolina is well positioned to help. Here are some of the ways in which university researchers and graduates are working to advance the health of South Carolina residents.

Photo of Jazmine Lara Guerrero, a first-gen student

First-generation college students add energy, resilience to USC campus

November 04, 2022, Megan Sexton

There is no typical first-generation college student. Some come from immigrant families, some from households where family members didn’t graduate from high school. But all add energy and variety to the University of South Carolina campus.

Remembering the Days podcast art

Remembering the Days -- Palmetto Ivy: How the Honors College came to be

October 31, 2022, Chris Horn

USC's Honors College was established in the 1970s around the time that several other of the nation's first honors colleges came into being. But the South Carolina Honors College would eventually emerge as one of the nation's best, boasting hundreds of honors courses and attracting some of the best students from the Palmetto State and beyond. 

head and shoulders photo of gail bush diggs

Students honor past Homecoming queen

October 27, 2022, Téa Smith

In 1974, Gail Bush Diggs became just the second Black woman to be named Homecoming Queen at the University of South Carolina. The announcement of her selection on the football field 48 years ago was greeted with racial abuse and she never received the traditional scepter that went with title. Students, looking to rectify that slight, will honor Diggs with the scepter at this year's Homecoming.

Faculty experts: 2022 Midterm elections

October 26, 2022, Alexis Watts

South Carolina voters will make decisions for many key races, including governor, U.S. Senate, U.S. House, and even two proposed state constitutional amendments. The University of South Carolina’s Office of Communications and Marketing has compiled a list of faculty experts.

Person showing off a shirt with the new University of South Carolina logo.

USC streamlines logo, introduces new spirit mark

October 26, 2022

On Oct. 26, the University of South Carolina announced a streamlining of its branding marks, retaining its iconic tree-and-gates as its official academic logo and introducing a new USC spirit mark. The university will sunset the “UofSC” logo mark adopted in 2019. The brand update will take effect on Jan. 4, 2023, with some changes taking place immediately.

James Clyburn speaks to the media against a backdrop that says

University establishes Clyburn endowed chair through $1.5 million gift from Boeing

October 20, 2022, Abe Danaher

The Boeing Co. has provided the University of South Carolina with a $1.5 million gift to establish the James E. and Emily E. Clyburn Endowed Chair of Public Service and Civic Engagement Fund. This endowed chair, awarded to associate professor Bobby Donaldson, will allow the university’s Center for Civil Rights History and Research to further its programming and outreach initiatives within the university community and across the state.

A light is shined into the back of a throat

Colonoscopy is still the most recommended screening for colorectal cancer, despite conflicting headlines and flawed interpretations of a new study

October 20, 2022, Franklin G. Berger

A recently published study in a high-profile medical journal appeared to call into question the efficacy of colonoscopy, a proven and widely utilized strategy for the screening and prevention of colorectal cancer. Distinguished professor emeritus of biological sciences Franklin G. Berger writes for The Conversation about the utility and need for colonoscopies.

Remembering the Days podcast art

Remembering the Days -- First things first

October 17, 2022, Chris Horn

Curtis Frye, head coach of field and track head at USC, knows a thing or two about coming in first place and being the first to do something. He's done all of those in his time at Carolina, including bringing home the university's first-ever national championship trophy. Perhaps most importantly, Coach Frye understands the importance of putting first things first. 

Parents and a child walk into school wearing masks

Pandemic shut down many special education services

October 17, 2022, Mitchell Yell

When schools shut down in March 2020, many of the nation’s roughly 7 million students in special education didn’t get the special education services to which they were entitled under federal law. Professor of special education Mitchell Yell writes for The Conversation about how school districts may have fallen short of providing special education services during the pandemic.

Eugenia Broude smiles while meeting with other faculty members.

Pharmacy researcher driven to find weapons in the fight against cancer

October 12, 2022, Margaret Gregory

College of Pharmacy professor Eugenia Broude had personal inspiration to pursue a career in science, and a newly awarded $3 million R01 grant from the National Cancer Institute will allow Broude and her co-investigators to continue their work in a groundbreaking area of breast cancer research.

A black and white photo of a man holding a bunch of bananas in front of a banana tree with a worried look on his face

What's a banana republic?

October 04, 2022, Matthew Wilson

When someone mentions a “banana republic,” they’re referring to a small, poor, politically unstable country that is weak because of an excessive reliance on one crop and foreign funding. Associate professor of political science Matthew Wilson writes for The Conversation about the use of the term over time.

VPR Julius Fridriksson

New vice president for research aims to mentor junior faculty

October 03, 2022, Craig Brandhorst

Julius Fridriksson loves a challenge. After climbing to the top of his field — and building out a research team of more than 40 faculty, post docs and graduate students at the Arnold School of Public Health — the onetime first-generation college student from a small village in Iceland agreed to become USC’s interim vice president for research in 2021.

A nursing student practices on a mannekin while a professor observes.

Columbia, Upstate campuses to receive Prisma Health funding for nursing programs

October 03, 2022, Kyndel Lee

The University of South Carolina’s Columbia and Upstate campuses are recipients of an investment in scholarships by Prisma Health to help counter the state’s critical nursing shortage.

2 health care workers move a woman on a stretcher through floodwaters in Florida

Hurricane Ian flooded a hospital and forced evacuations from dozens of nursing homes

September 30, 2022, Brett Robertson

Hurricane Ian, one of the most powerful storms to hit the U.S., tore part of the roof off a hospital in Port Charlotte, Florida, and flooded the building’s lower level emergency room, sending staff scrambling to move patients as water poured in. Brett Robertson, assistant professor of communication in UofSC's College of Information and Communications, writes about how hospitals and other health care organizations can better prepare for disasters.

Booker T. Washington alumni look at display

New agreement with National Park Service advances UofSC's role in telling civil rights history

September 28, 2022, Alexis Watts

Under a five-year agreement with the National Park Service, the center will receive $3.4 million to expand the center’s existing work in civil rights education and scholarly research, including support for exhibits and programming at South Carolina sites in the African American Civil Rights Network. The center will help to grow the network in South Carolina by serving as a resource to property owners, community leaders and organizations interested in joining the network.

Remembering the Days podcast art

Remembering the Days -- Grand Tourino: the Visitor Center

September 27, 2022, Chris Horn

Every year, tens of thousands of prospective students and their families visit the University of South Carolina for a campus tour. Here's the story of how the university's Visitor Center came to be, as well as a peek behind the curtains at some unscripted moments in the lives of campus tour guides. 

Artistic version of American flag

Conservatives and liberals are equally likely to fund local causes, but liberals are more apt to also donate to national and global groups - new research

September 26, 2022, Nancy R. Buchan

Conservatives were less generous overall than liberals during an experiment in which people could give some money to COVID-19 relief charities. Nancy R. Buchan, associate professor of international business, writes for The Conversation about political donations.

Remembering the Days podcast art

Remembering the Days -- The not-so-secret gardens

September 26, 2022, Chris Horn

“If you look the right way, you can see that the whole world … is a garden.” When Frances Hodgson Burnett penned those words more than a century ago in her classic children’s book The Secret Garden, there probably were very few, perhaps not any flower gardens on the University of South Carolina campus. But we’ve made up for it in the past 50 years or so. On this short tour, you'll learn the history of several not-so-secret gardens on campus and what's planted in each one. 

Hand wearing bracelet drops mask into trash can

Is the pandemic over? We asked an economist, an education expert and a public health scholar their views

September 26, 2022, William Hauk

President Joe Biden’s declaration that “the pandemic is over” raised eyebrows and the hackles of some experts who think such messaging could be premature and counterproductive. William Hauk, associate professor of economics in the Darla Moore School of Business, was one of three scholars asked by The Conversation to evaluate just how “over” the pandemic is.

Three flags fly over the South Carolina Statehouse

UofSC's proposed budget seeks to hold down tuition, invest in learning environments & research initiatives

September 22, 2022, Jeff Stensland

The University of South Carolina’s proposed budget for fiscal year 2023-24 seeks to keep tuition affordable for students across its eight-campus system. The budget proposal also prioritizes construction of classrooms and innovative learning spaces, invests in research infrastructure and clinical outreach, as well as initiatives to support needs of students across the USC System.

John Gerdes sits in the makerspace.

Gerdes looking to foster innovation, belonging in Rhodos living learning community

September 22, 2022, Mafe Balthazar

Innovative technology and design, academic advancement and his students are things John Gerdes is passionate about. As the new faculty principal of the Rhodos Fellows living learning community, Gerdes hopes to build a supportive atmosphere that encourages curiosity and supports the creativity of his students.

The Maxcy monument stands right of center on the historic Horseshoe, which is green with summer

UofSC implements new compensation structure to improve employee recruitment, retention

September 16, 2022, Carol Ward

All University of South Carolina staff members will receive new job titles and about 650 will receive pay increases as part of an initiative to attract and retain employees. The Division of Human Resources recently completed a classification and compensation study to better align the university’s pay structure with salaries in the market and create a comprehensive strategy.

wrought iron gates

U.S. News rankings: UofSC retains top spot in international business, first-year student experience

September 09, 2022, Megan Sexton

The University of South Carolina has the top first-year student experience of any public college in the country and the best international business program, according to U.S. News & World Report’s annual undergraduate rankings.

A male (left) and female (right) smiling while walking in the sun

Going out on the town? Here's how to stay safe

September 02, 2022, Audrey Hill

The start of a new school year brings new adventures, reunions with old friends and all the activities of a bustling campus in the heart of South Carolina's Capital City. Students, particularly those unfamiliar with the Columbia area, should take a few simple precautions to make sure they stay safe while exploring the city and getting to know their classmates.

Remembering the Days podcast art

Remembering the Days -- The Myth of Commodore Capstone

August 25, 2022, Chris Horn

What building on the University of South Carolina campus was named for a Confederate navy commodore and commemorated on a picture postcard? It's a trick question! A high-rise residence hall was featured on a postcard in the late 1960s, and the caption on the postcard said the building was named in honor of alumnus Epaminondas J. Capstone, a Confederate commodore. But separate fact from fiction is the real story.

Remembering the Days podcast art

Remembering the Days -- Sink or Swim: the freshman lifesaver course

August 22, 2022, Chris Horn

Fifty years ago, it wasn't uncommon to hear professors give the "look to your left, look to your right — one of you will have failed by the end of the semester" speech. But exactly 50 years ago, Carolina tried something different: a course designed to help freshmen feel like they belonged along with the academic tools they needed to succeed. It was called University 101, and it became model for hundreds of colleges across the country.

Three students smile while sitting at a table.

On Your Time Initiatives improves experience, decreases debt for UofSC students

August 19, 2022, Abe Danaher

By developing offerings such as three-week winter semesters, summer minors, accelerated study plans and winter study abroad opportunities, On Your Time Initiatives is breaking higher education’s traditional academic structure to provide South Carolina’s students with increased flexibility, higher graduation rates and decreased debt.

A black and white pill opposite of a black and white background

Many drugs have mirror image chemical structures - while one may be helpful, the other may be harmful

August 16, 2022, Sajish Mathew

Many drugs have the same atoms and bonds but are arranged differently in space. These drugs are called chiral compounds — meaning they exist as two mirror images. Sajish Mathew writes for The Conversation on how these compounds are arranged in space can drastically change the effects they have in the body.

Teacher wearing black and white polka dotted shirt pointing at an electronic board while teaching elementary school students

The most recent efforts to combat teacher shortages don't address the real problems

August 15, 2022, Henry Tran

The national teacher shortage is rooted is the longstanding lack of respect for teachers and their craft, which is reflected by decades of low pay, hyperscrutiny and poor working conditions. This disrespect to the profession is what is driving teachers away. Education professor Henry Tran writes for The Conversation on how the most recent efforts to recruit teachers do not address the real problems.